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Exploration of the role of philosophy in education- creating a vision, developing ideas for implementation, finding causes and effects of its absence, finding solutions, identifying myths and misconceptions

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DANGERS of embracing philosophy

As strongly as I feel about philosophy, there are definitely dangers, pitfalls, and wrong roads that will take us to bad places, if we are not aware, vigilant, and thoughtful.  Here are a few dangers to avoid, from my perspective;Studying PHILOSOPHY as end in itselfStudying PHILOSOPHY as mental masturbationStudying PHILOSOPHY as unconnected to self, action, experience, society, daily lifeStudying PHILOSOPHY as having pre-determined answers passed on by the society in which it is being…

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Social Studies Teachers

I have been doing a lot of thinking about social studies teachers in two contexts:     Is there an unhealthy bias toward history that is an obstacle for philosophy in our         dialogue?This one could be a presentation thesis:    Is there an unhealthy gap between our consensus for citizenship education as the aim for social studies and the reality of virtually negative impact in that arena?  Could it be that what we are doing isn’t working? working against? that teaching history doesn’t…

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Some generalizations I have come to about how we should be constructing curriculum, especially in relation to philosophy

Here are some reflections that I have about how we should be constructing curriculum, especially in relation to philosophy.  Maybe one or more of these will spike discussion.....The curriculum that strives for the aim of education is for everyone, regardless of vocation, performance, or even interest.A Pattern of Severe Separations•A curriculum must close the separation between aims and practice.•A curriculum must close the separation between aims and ends.    •A curriculum must close the…

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Myth 2- Philosophy is for the gifted, the "smart" kids and the college bound.

One of the travesties of the NCLB standardized testing craze is the elimination of rich complex curriculum, especially for the students identified as "below proficient." Instead of exploring themes of humanity in literature, they are reading 1 page out of context non-fiction pieces for the purposes of finding the main idea, evidence to support the main idea, and inferences- as an end in themselves for test taking, not to dig into a beautiful piece of literature to learn about ourselces, others,…

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